Workshops

Chatbots for Social Good

Contact the organiser: asbjorn.folstad@sintef.no

Visit the workshop website: https://sites.google.com/view/chatbotsforsocialgood2019

Chatbots have substantial potential for social good. Examples include chatbots in support of public health and wellbeing, chatbots for educational support, and chatbots to strengthen community building. To help realize this potential, researchers and practitioners with an interest in chatbot research and design is invited to a full day workshop. Together we will explore how chatbots may be designed and developed for social good, and the potential implications of such a perspective. We will specifically address what it means for chatbots to be designed and developed for social good, salient examples of such chatbots, future opportunities and challenges, and how to change chatbot design and development practice to reflect a concern for social good. Participants are selected on the basis of submitted position papers (3-6 pages, Springer LNCS format). Each submission will be peer-reviewed by three workshop organizers Accepted position papers are published in the official adjunct conference proceedings and made available through the workshop webpage. The workshop outcomes will be proposed actions for industry and research, written up by the workshop organizers, in collaboration with volunteer workshop participants, and made available to a broader audience through the workshop webpage and possibly also other publications.

Organizers

Asbjørn Følstad (SINTEF), Effie L.-C. Law (Leicester University), Tom Feltwell (Northumbria University), Ewa Luger (University of Edinburgh), Petter Bae Brandtzaeg (SINTEF).

Designing for Aging People (DEAP 2019)

Contact the organisers: masood.masoodian@aalto.fi palexa@gmail.com

Visit the workshop website: http://avcd.aalto.fi/deap2019  

Most existing design practices either do not specifically target the needs of aging people, or only consider their needs from a negative perspective, often as design “problems” that need to be “solved”.

However, with the ever-increasing aging world population, it is becoming even more important to better design for older people, taking their wants, needs, desires, and expectations into account as the underlying basis for design.

Amongst other issues that need to be addressed, this also requires modifying current design practices, including commonly used design methodologies, to make them more effective for targeting aging user populations.

Therefore, the aim of this workshop is to bring together researchers, designers, and developers interested in the design, development, evaluation, and deployment of digital products, technologies, tool, and services for aging people. The workshop will provide a venue for sharing experiences from different perspectives through presentations, discussions, and a hands-on design activity to provide innovative ideas for future directions in designing for aging people.

This workshop follows on from a successful previous workshop (DEAP 2018), which was held as part of the IFIP International Conference on Entertainment Computing (IFIP-ICEC 2018). We have now broadened the scope of this workshop to include all aspects of designing for aging people.

Organizers

Masood Masoodian, Aalto University (Finland), Paula Alexandra Silva, Universidade de Aveiro (Portugal)

Challenging Misinformation: Exploring Limits and Approaches

Contact the organisers:

Lara Piccolo – lara.piccolo@open.ac.uk
Somya Joshi – somya@dsv.su.se
Evangelos Karapanos – evangelos.karapanos@cut.ac.cy
Tracie Farrell – tracie.farrell@open.ac.uk

Visit the workshop website: http://events.kmi.open.ac.uk/misinformation/ 

The manipulation of information and the dissemination of ”fake news” are practices that trace back to the early records of human history.
Yet, significant changes in the technological environment enabling ubiquity, immediacy and considerable anonymity, have facilitated the spreading of misinformation in unforeseen ways, raising concerns around people’s (mis)perception of social issues worldwide. As a wicked problem, limiting the harm caused by misinformation goes beyond technical solutions, requiring also regulatory and behavioural changes.
In such a scenario, social media players, technology designers, policymakers, journalists, educators and citizens are all stakeholders with some responsibility in understanding the problem on its complexity and come up with pieces of solutions that will limit the spread and impact of misinformation worldwide.
This workshop proposes to unpack the challenge at hand by bringing together diverse perspectives to the problem. Based on participatory design principles, it will challenge participants to critically reflect the limits of existing socio-technical approaches, aggregate solutions and co-create scenarios in which digital platforms support misinformation resilience.
A longer-term goal is to build a community around relevant topics and research on how misinformation resilient societies can be designed. From an Human-Computer Interaction perspective, we hope to impact society through the design and development of socio-technical systems that respond to the social media context and its current struggles between what is considered fact and fiction.

Organizers

Lara Piccolo (Knowledge Media Institute, The Open University), Somya Joshi (eGovlab, Stockholm University), Evangelos Karapanos (Cyprus University of Technology), Tracie Farrell (Knowledge Media Institute, The Open University)

Designing Sensitive Applications for the Illiterate

Contact the organisers:

Jane Katusiime – jane.katusiime@hu-berlin.de or janek@must.ac.ug
Niels Pinkwart – pinkwart@hu-berlin.de
Angella Musiimenta – amusiimenta@must.ac.ug
Lisa Butler – lisa.butler@uconn.edu

Visit the workshop website: to be confirmed

In the current era where technology is being utilized in most aspects of life such as health care, commerce and education, researchers and developers have mainly focused on designing and developing applications that are more usable by people who can read and write. This creates a digital divide and leaves an unanswered question, “what happens to the illiterate who are unable to use most of the available applications?” This divide is worse in the implementation of sensitive systems. The sensitivity of information captured in sensitive systems such as banking and health applications calls for an emphasis on the security of the information and privacy of the users which raises a unique set of requirements for illiterate users. This workshop will provide a platform for researchers, designers and policy makers from various backgrounds to discuss inclusive design aspects, design trade-offs, privacy, security and usability concerns that are associated with designing and developing sensitive applications for illiterate people.

Organizers

Jane Katusiime (Humboldt Universität zu Berlin, Mbarara / University of Science and Technology (MUST)), Niels Pinkwart (Humboldt Universität zu Berlin),
Angella Musiimenta (Mbarara University of Science and Technology (MUST)), Lisa Butler (University of Connecticut)

Fashnology Across Social, Cultural, and Religious Ideals and Practices

Contact the organisers:

Shiroq Al-Megren – salmegren@ksu.edu.sa / shiroq@mit.edu
Najwa Alghamdi – nalghamdi@ksu.edu.sa
Ragad Allwihan – lwihanr@ksau-hs.edu.sa
Nora Alrajebah – nrajebah@ksu.edu.sa

Visit the workshop website: https://fashn-ology.com

In this workshop, we will explore and discuss the role of wearables and their support of everyday life in the light of varying social, cultural, and religious ideals and practices. We believe this is achieved by considering the intersection of wearables and fashion (i.e. fashnology) and begin conceptualizing a framework for socially-, culturally-, and religiously-conscious designs. Through the workshop, we aim to bring together researchers and practitioners that are interested in the design of inclusive wearables to share existing challenges and opportunities and discuss wearability factors that are relevant to fashnology. We will be sharing the results of the workshop with the wider Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) community through various social channels.

Organizers

Shiroq Al-Megren (King Saud University and Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Saudi Arabia and the United States, respectively), Najwa Alghamdi (King Saud University, Saudi Arabia), Ragad Allwihan (King Saud Bin AbdulAziz University for Health Science), Nora Alrajebah (King Saud University, Saudi Arabia)

Visualizing Information Retrieved from (large) WHAT Networks

Contact the organisers: what19@hciv.de

Visit the workshop website: http://www.hciv.de/what19

At INTERACT 2017 the organizers of this workshop had organized a very successful workshop called “Beyond Computers: Wearables, Humans, And Things – WHAT!”. Following that workshop, which focused on new and emerging WHAT technologies themselves, in this workshop, we want to address networks of WHATs as well as visualization- and interaction-technologies to deal with data emerging from these networks. Using WHATs as sensors, large networks of these provide large amounts of information. Such networks can range e.g. from smartwatches monitoring and transmitting the health status of participants in a fun run via smart tags monitoring and transmitting the storage conditions of perishable foods up to large networks of smart sensors monitoring environmental conditions in some urban or industrial environment. The large amounts of data generated from such networks need new paradigms for retrieving relevant information. In this workshop, we want to discuss such new paradigms for interacting with data generated from large networks of WHATs as well as new methods of information visualization to utilize these sensor data. Furthermore, utilizing WHATs themselves as means for interaction with and visualizing information contained in these large amounts of data will be a topic of this workshop.

Organizers

Gerrit van der Veer (Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, The Netherlands), Achim Ebert (University of Kaiserslautern, Germany), Nahum Gershon (The MITRE Corporation, United States of America), Peter Dannenmann (RheinMain University of Applied Sciences, Germany)

#SociallyAcceptableHCI: Social Acceptability of Emerging Technologies and Novel Interaction Paradigms

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User Experiences and …

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The Human(s) in the Loop – Bringing AI and HCI Together

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IFIP WG 13.2 Workshop on Handling Security, Usability, User Experience and Reliability in User-Centered Development Processes

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Design and Accessibility of New Technologies for Assisting Disabled and Older People

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Pushing the Boundaries of Participatory Design

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HCI Challenges in Human Movement Analysis

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