Workshops

WS1. Chatbots for Social Good

Cancelled

WS2. Designing for Aging People (DEAP 2019)

September 3, 2019

Contact the organisers: masood.masoodian@aalto.fi palexa@gmail.com

Visit the workshop website: http://avcd.aalto.fi/deap2019  

Most existing design practices either do not specifically target the needs of aging people, or only consider their needs from a negative perspective, often as design “problems” that need to be “solved”.

However, with the ever-increasing aging world population, it is becoming even more important to better design for older people, taking their wants, needs, desires, and expectations into account as the underlying basis for design.

Amongst other issues that need to be addressed, this also requires modifying current design practices, including commonly used design methodologies, to make them more effective for targeting aging user populations.

Therefore, the aim of this workshop is to bring together researchers, designers, and developers interested in the design, development, evaluation, and deployment of digital products, technologies, tool, and services for aging people. The workshop will provide a venue for sharing experiences from different perspectives through presentations, discussions, and a hands-on design activity to provide innovative ideas for future directions in designing for aging people.

This workshop follows on from a successful previous workshop (DEAP 2018), which was held as part of the IFIP International Conference on Entertainment Computing (IFIP-ICEC 2018). We have now broadened the scope of this workshop to include all aspects of designing for aging people.

Organizers

Masood Masoodian, Aalto University (Finland), Paula Alexandra Silva, Universidade de Aveiro (Portugal)

WS3. Challenging Misinformation: Exploring Limits and Approaches

September 3, 2019

Contact the organisers:

Lara Piccolo – lara.piccolo@open.ac.uk
Somya Joshi – somya@dsv.su.se
Evangelos Karapanos – evangelos.karapanos@cut.ac.cy
Tracie Farrell – tracie.farrell@open.ac.uk

Visit the workshop website: http://events.kmi.open.ac.uk/misinformation/ 

The manipulation of information and the dissemination of ”fake news” are practices that trace back to the early records of human history.
Yet, significant changes in the technological environment enabling ubiquity, immediacy and considerable anonymity, have facilitated the spreading of misinformation in unforeseen ways, raising concerns around people’s (mis)perception of social issues worldwide. As a wicked problem, limiting the harm caused by misinformation goes beyond technical solutions, requiring also regulatory and behavioural changes.
In such a scenario, social media players, technology designers, policymakers, journalists, educators and citizens are all stakeholders with some responsibility in understanding the problem on its complexity and come up with pieces of solutions that will limit the spread and impact of misinformation worldwide.
This workshop proposes to unpack the challenge at hand by bringing together diverse perspectives to the problem. Based on participatory design principles, it will challenge participants to critically reflect the limits of existing socio-technical approaches, aggregate solutions and co-create scenarios in which digital platforms support misinformation resilience.
A longer-term goal is to build a community around relevant topics and research on how misinformation resilient societies can be designed. From an Human-Computer Interaction perspective, we hope to impact society through the design and development of socio-technical systems that respond to the social media context and its current struggles between what is considered fact and fiction.

Organizers

Lara Piccolo (Knowledge Media Institute, The Open University), Somya Joshi (eGovlab, Stockholm University), Evangelos Karapanos (Cyprus University of Technology), Tracie Farrell (Knowledge Media Institute, The Open University)

WS4. Designing Sensitive Applications for the Illiterate

Cancelled

WS5. Fashnology Across Social, Cultural, and Religious Ideals and Practices

Cancelled

WS6. Visualizing Information Retrieved from (large) WHAT Networks

September 2, 2019

Contact the organisers: what19@hciv.de

Visit the workshop website: http://www.hciv.de/what19

At INTERACT 2017 the organizers of this workshop had organized a very successful workshop called “Beyond Computers: Wearables, Humans, And Things – WHAT!”. Following that workshop, which focused on new and emerging WHAT technologies themselves, in this workshop, we want to address networks of WHATs as well as visualization- and interaction-technologies to deal with data emerging from these networks. Using WHATs as sensors, large networks of these provide large amounts of information. Such networks can range e.g. from smartwatches monitoring and transmitting the health status of participants in a fun run via smart tags monitoring and transmitting the storage conditions of perishable foods up to large networks of smart sensors monitoring environmental conditions in some urban or industrial environment. The large amounts of data generated from such networks need new paradigms for retrieving relevant information. In this workshop, we want to discuss such new paradigms for interacting with data generated from large networks of WHATs as well as new methods of information visualization to utilize these sensor data. Furthermore, utilizing WHATs themselves as means for interaction with and visualizing information contained in these large amounts of data will be a topic of this workshop.

Organizers

Gerrit van der Veer (Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, The Netherlands), Achim Ebert (University of Kaiserslautern, Germany), Nahum Gershon (The MITRE Corporation, United States of America), Peter Dannenmann (RheinMain University of Applied Sciences, Germany)

WS7. #SociallyAcceptableHCI: Social Acceptability of Emerging Technologies and Novel Interaction Paradigms

September 2, 2019

Contact the organisers:  socialacceptabilityworkshop@uol.de

Visit the workshop website: https://www.socialacceptabilityworkshop.uol.de

Human-computer interfaces have spread into all aspects of our lives increasing the range and scale of potential issues with social acceptance. In consequence, attending to social acceptability issues with emerging technologies and novel interaction paradigms has become increasingly relevant and interesting to the HCI community. The ‘#SociallyAcceptableHCI – INTERACT’19 Workshop on the Social Acceptability of Emerging Technologies and Novel Interaction Paradigms’ explores how those issues are identified, evaluated, measured, and addressed in the HCI community and beyond. We invite academics and practitioners to come together for one day and discuss socially (un)acceptable HCI technologies and artifacts: How is social acceptability defined in HCI? What is the role of social acceptability in user experience? What are best practices in designing socially acceptable interfaces? How can we measure and evaluate the social acceptability of an interactive system?
We aim for a better understanding of social acceptability of HCI, and to distill what is already known in terms of best-practices and heuristics. We will start a collection of design patterns for socially acceptable interfaces and interactions (case book) and will put theory in context through hands-on experiences (field trip).

For more information and submitting your contributions, please visit the workshop website.

Organisers

  • Marion Koelle, University of Oldenburg
  • Ceenu George, University of Munich
  • Valentin Schwind, University of Regensburg
  • Daniel Perry, North, Inc.
  • Yumiko Sakamoto, University of Manitoba
  • Khalad Hasan, University of British Columbia
  • Robb Mitchell, University of Southern Denmark
  • Thoma OIsson, University of Tampere

WS8. User Experiences and Wellbeing at Work (UX@Work)

September 2, 2019

Contact the organisers

Ganesh Bhutkar – ganesh.bhutkar@vit.edu
Virpi Roto – virpi.roto@aalto.fi

Visit the workshop website: https://blogs.aalto.fi/uxatwork/

Building wellbeing for employees is an important challenge for today’s organizations and companies. Work efficiency as well as personal health is affected if the employee wellbeing is not maintained in the organization. It can also lead to employee absenteeism as well as reduced productivity at workplaces. Designing for employee wellbeing is an increasingly popular research topic with opportunities also for the Human-Computer Interaction community.

Use of digital technologies at these workplaces is an increasingly large part of the daily activities, thus an increasingly important part of ensuring wellbeing at work. Mobile tools also enable users to work at different times and/or different places in challenging and creative ways. UX@Work workshop aims to tackle this development by proposing a research agenda for studying the role of interactive technologies at increasingly digitized or Industry 4.0 workplaces.

Organisers

Following members of the group – IFIP TC13 WG6 Human Work Interaction Design (HWID):

  • Ganesh Bhutkar, Vishwakarma Institute of Technology (VIT) Pune, INDIA
  • Virpi Roto, Aalto University, FINLAND
  • Torkil Clemmensen, Copenhagen Business School, DENMARK
  • Barbara Rita Barricelli, Università degli Studi di Milano, ITALY
  • Jose Abdelnour Nocera, University of West London, UK
  • Alexander Meschtscherjakov, Salzburg University, AUSTRIA
  • Arminda Lopes, Instituto Politécnico de Castelo Branco, PORTUGAL
  • Pedro Campos, University of Madeira, PORTUGAL
  • Frederica Gonçalves, University of Madeira, PORTUGAL

WS9. Human(s) in the Loop – Bringing AI & HCI Together

September 3, 2019

Contact the organisers

Visit the workshop website: http://aka.ms/AI-HCI-Interact2019

As more and more artificial intelligent systems become incorporated into our every-day lives, it is critical that we understand the ways in which people will interact with these systems. Although some AI systems will be fully automated, a large number will be incorporated into a larger social ecosystem where people will be interacting with these systems. In some cases, advances in machine learning are enabling systems to make inferences on data that are more precise than human experts, however, there is also a growing body of literature that shows that these systems have inherent bias and can have a negative impact on human decision making. It is imperative that researchers understand the smart interplay of AI systems and human experts such that the combination of the two can leverage the inherent strength and weaknesses of each to lead to optimal results. In this workshop, we seek to bring together researchers from both Artificial Intelligence and Human-Computer Interaction communities to discuss concepts, systems, designs, and empirical studies focusing on the communication and cooperation between individual users and teams of users with AI systems.

Organizers

  • Dr. Tom Gross, University of Bamberg, Germany
  • Dr. Kori Inkpen, Microsoft Research, USA
  • Dr. Brian Lim, National University of Singapore, Singapore
  • Michael Veale, University College London, UK

WS10. IFIP WG 13.2 & WG 13.5 Workshop on Handling Security, Usability , User Experience and Reliability in User-Centered Development Processes

September 3, 2019

Contact the organisers

Visit the workshop website: https://sites.google.com/site/ifipwg132workshopinteract19/home

Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) research has been focusing on properties such as usability,accessibility, inclusive design, user experience. As new security risks are emerging with the continuous increase of Internet interconnections and the development of the Internet of Things, more recently security, trust and resilience havealsobecome important for the development of interactive systems.

Since users have been identified as one of the major security weaknesses in today’s technologies, HCI becomes a fundamental pillar for designing more secure (but still usable) systems. However, interactive systemproperties might overlap and sometimes create conflicts in user-centered development processes. For example, security could reduce system usability by placing a burden on users when they have to deal with passwords.The HCI research has provided several tools and techniquesthat can supportdesigners in makingdecisions, but there are no “cookbooks”. This workshop promotes sharing of experiences in managing and resolving conflictsof multiple interactive systemproperties within the context ofauser-centered design process. We are concerned by theories, methods and approaches for dealing with interactive system properties, managing potential conflicts and trade-offs. This workshop is organized by the IFIP WG 13.2 on Methodology for User-Centered System Designand the IFIP WG 13.5 on Human Error, Resilience, Reliability and Safety in System Development.

Organisers

  • Carmelo Ardito – University of Bari Aldo Moro, Italy
  • Regina Bernhaupt – Eindhoven University of Technology, The Netherlands
  • Philippe Palanque – Université Toulouse III – Paul Sabatier, France
  • Stefan Sauer – Paderborn University, Germany

WS11. Design and Accessibility of New Technologies for Assisting Disabled and Older People

September 3, 2019

Workshops WS11 and WS12 will be merged.

Contact the organisers:

Visit the workshop website: https://designandaccessibility.wordpress.com

This workshop brings together researchers and practitioners interested in designing and developing new technologies and subverting mainstream technologies for assisting disabled and older people. Frameworks and concepts related to this area cause confusion and misunderstandings (e.g. universal design, inclusive design, user sensitive design, design for all, accessibility, universal usability), so we will work towards a clear conceptual mapping of frameworks and concepts. A second area of confusion and misunderstandings is the needs and desires of the different user groups involved, often solutions are developed to problems people do not have or solutions are not acceptable to the user groups. Therefore, a matrix of needs/desires and areas of potential technological development will be generated. Finally, this area involves many ethical, privacy and security issues. These areas will be explored and we will work towards guidance for researchers and practitioners.

Organizers

  • Gerhard Weber – Technische Universitat Dresden, Germany
  • Helen Petrie – University of York, UK
  • Jenny Darzentas – University of the Aegean, Greece

WS12. Pushing the Boundaries of Participatory Design

September 3, 2019

Workshops WS11 and WS12 will be merged.

Contact the organisers:

Visit the workshop website: https://www.pushing-boundaries-pd-fringe-groups.inf.ed.ac.uk

Participatory Design (PD) is a design approach which aims to support users to contribute as partners throughout the entire design process of a product or service intended for their use. PD researchers are interested in employing and/or developing methods and techniques that maximise users’ contributions. By accommodating specific popula- tions, PD proved to offer unique benefits when designing technology for “fringe” groups. However, a lack of understanding of the appropriateness of existing approaches across groups and contexts presents a challenge for the PD community. This workshop will encourage discussion around this challenge. The participants will have the opportunity to exchange and reflect on their experiences with using PD with “fringe” groups. Moreover, we aim to identify, synthesise and collate PD best practices across contexts and participant groups.

Organizers

  • Jessica Korte – University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia
  • Aurora Constantin – University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK
  • Cristina Adriana Alexandru – University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK
  • Jerry Alan Fails – Boise State University, Boise, Idaho
  • Eva Eriksson – Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark
  • Judith Good – University of Sussex, Brighton, UK
  • Helen Pain – University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK
  • Juan Pablo Hourcade – University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa, USA
  • Franca Garzotto – Politecnico di Milano, Milan, Italy
  • Annalu Waller – University of Dundee, Dundee, UK

WS13. HCI Challenges in Human Movement Analysis

September 2, 2019

Contact the organisers

Visit the workshop website: www.hci-human-movement.org

Assessing human bodies’ postures and positions enables to design new interaction techniques, to understand users’ performances and to evaluate ergonomics of devices.  In addition to the applications for improving Human-Computer Interaction, human movement analysis is at the heart of other types of usages including sports, rehabilitation, gesture recognition, etc. This workshop aims at providing a platform for researchers and designers to discuss the challenges related to the processing (e.g., data collection, treatment, interpretation, recognition) of human movement (e.g., motor skills, amplitude of movements, limitations). We invite researchers and designers applying or interested in assessing human movement to participate in this one-day workshop aiming at discussing limitations and perspectives for developing all the possible applications going forward.

Organisers

  • Lilian Genaro Motti Ader, School of Public Health, Physiotherapy and Sport Science, University College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland
  • Benoît Bossavit, KDEG Group, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland
  • Brian Caulfield, School of Public Health, Physiotherapy and Sport Science, University College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland
  • Mathieu Raynal, ELIPSE team, IRIT Lab, Université de Toulouse, Toulouse, France
  • Karine Lan Hing Ting, Living Lab ActivAgeing, Université de technologie de Troyes, Troyes, France
  • Jean Vanderdonckt, Louvain Interaction Lab, Université Catholique de Louvain, Louvain-la-Neuve, Belgium
  • Nadine Vigouroux, ELIPSE team, IRIT Lab, IRIT, Université de Toulouse, Toulouse, France